The Academy of St Martin in the Fields: One night only « Bach Festival Society
January 16, 2013

The Academy of St Martin in the Fields: One night only

The Bach Festival Society of Winter Park presents the Academy of St Martin in the Fields, performing in Central Florida for one night only, March 16, 2013. One of the finest chamber orchestras in the world, the Academy is known for its polished and refined sound, rooted in outstanding musicianship.

The Britten, Bach, and Haydn program features two award-winning soloists: cellist Alisa Weilerstein and pianist Inon Barnatan.
In order to accommodate the great interest in these performers, this special engagement will be held at Trinity Preparatory School’s Performing Arts Center.

WHEN/WHERE
Saturday, March 16, 2013, at 8:00pm
Trinity Preparatory School Performing Arts Center
5700 Trinity Prep Lane, Winter Park, FL 32792

TICKETS
Tickets range from $40 to $80.
Call the Box Office at 407.646.2182 or visit www.BachFestivalFlorida.org.

MEDIA REQUESTS
Contact Laura Wilcox to coordinate live shots, still photos, interviews, etc. High-resolution photos of The Academy of St Martin in the Fields, Alisa Weilerstein, and Inon Barnatan are available on request.

MORE INFO
This performance will feature Andrew Haveron as conductor.
The program includes Britten’s Variations on a Theme of Frank Bridge Op.10; Haydn’s Cello Concerto No. 1 in C Major, Haydn’s Symphony No. 45 in f-sharp minor (“Farewell”), Haydn’s Symphony No. 44 in e minor (“Trauer”), and Bach’s Piano Concerto No. 1 in d minor BWV 1052.

The Academy of St. Martin in the Fields was formed by a group of leading London musicians in 1958. The orchestra performed without a conductor in its first performance at its namesake church in 1959. Today, the Academy performs over 100 concerts around the world each year, with as many as 15 tours each season. The orchestra has maintained a partnership with founder Sir Neville Marriner, and together they have made over 500 recordings, remaining the most recorded pairing of orchestra and conductor.

Cello soloist Alisa Weilerstein has drawn attention for her impassioned playing, which combines a natural virtuosic command of the instrument and technical precision with impressive musicianship. Born in 1982, Ms. Weilerstein made her Cleveland Orchestra debut at age 13, playing the Tchaikovsky “Rococo” Variations. She has performed under legendary conductors with major orchestras and festivals in the United States and Europe, an accomplishment especially remarkable as she is only thirty years of age. In 2008 Ms. Weilerstein was awarded Lincoln Center’s Martin E. Segal prize for exceptional achievement, and she was named the winner of the 2006 Leonard Bernstein Award. She received an Avery Fisher Career Grant in 2000. Weilerstein was named a MacArthur Foundation Fellow in 2011, and in 2010 she became the first cellist in 30 years to be offered an exclusive recording contract with Decca Classics. This performance is part of her debut tour with the Academy of St. Martin in the Fields.

Piano soloist Inon Barnatan has gained international recognition for engaging and communicative performances that pair insightful interpretation with impeccable technique. Mr. Barnatan was born in Tel Aviv in 1979, and since moving to the United States in 2006 he has made his orchestral debuts with the Cleveland Orchestra and the Houston, Philadelphia, and San Francisco Symphony Orchestras and has performed in New York at Carnegie Hall, the Metropolitan Museum, and Alice Tully Hall. In 2009 he was awarded a prestigious Avery Fisher Career Grant, an honor reflecting the strong impression he has made on the American music scene. Mr. Barnatan has appeared as a soloist throughout the United States and the rest of the world, and he has previously toured with the Academy of St. Martini in the Fields. Mr. Barnatan is equally valued as a soloist, recitalist, and chamber musician.

Alisa Weilerstein and Inon Barnatan previously toured together during the first months of 2012 on an eight-city European tour.

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