FAQ « Bach Festival Society

FAQs

We hope our answers to these Frequently Asked Questions will help you better plan your visit. If you still need more information, don’t hesitate to contact us at info@bachfestivalflorida.org or call us at 407.646.2182.

What should I wear to a Bach Festival Society performance?
Audience members wear a range of dress to performances, from dressy to casual. If you are a first-time attendee to the Bach Festival Society, you may feel most comfortable in business casual attire.

How long does a performance usually last?
Including intermission, concerts generally last 2 hours – the same amount of time it would take to see a movie.

When should I applaud during a concert?
During a classical music performance, it is customary to wait until the end of a piece to applaud. Most classical pieces have several movements; the program will help you know how many movements a piece has. Additionally, the conductor will signal when a piece is over by dropping his or her hands and relaxing. If you’re still unsure about when applause is appropriate, wait for someone else in the audience to clap.

At the beginning of a concert, it is also an established tradition to clap for the concertmaster (the principal first violinist), the conductor, and any soloists when they come onto the stage.

May I bring my child to a concert?
Older children are welcome to attend all of our concerts. The annual Holiday Concert is particularly fun for families to attend together to kick-off the holiday season.

May I attend a rehearsal of the Bach Festival Society?
The Bach Festival Society has closed rehearsals to allow the conductor to focus solely on the choir and orchestra without distraction. Occasionally, the Society will open a rehearsal to the public, which gives our visitors a chance to look  behind the scenes at what it takes to bring a major choral work together.

What do I do if I’m running late?
Late seating is allowed at the discretion of the house manager. A staff member will escort you into the venue during a minimally disruptive time between movements.